Learn about anaphylaxis and how to use Teva’s Epinephrine Auto-Injector.

Anaphylaxis is a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction that can happen within minutes of a person being in contact with an allergen. Insect stings, certain foods or medicines, and other substances can cause this reaction. Be sure to discuss causes of anaphylaxis with your healthcare provider.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis can include flushed skin, fall in blood pressure, convulsions, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, itching, rashes, and more. See the Patient Information for more symptoms of anaphylaxis. It’s important to stay calm and act quickly during an emergency.

3 steps for using Teva’s Epinephrine
Auto-Injector.

Get familiar with these steps in the summary below.
Be sure to read the full Instructions for Use provided
with your auto-injector before you use it.

Your healthcare provider will show you how to safely use the epinephrine auto-injector. Use the epinephrine auto-injector exactly as your healthcare provider tells you.

See the Full Instructions for Use

A grey Trainer auto-injector is included in each pack. The Trainer contains no medicine and no needle. You can practice with the Trainer. See the Instructions for Use for practice instructions.

  1. The blue safety release helps prevent accidental injection of the device. Do not remove the blue safety release until you are ready to use it.

    Prepare the injection

    • Quickly twist off the yellow or green cap in the direction of the "twist arrow" to remove it
    • Grasp the auto-injector in your fist with the orange tip (needle end) pointing downward. With your other hand, pull off the blue safety release
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  2. Only inject into the middle of the outer thigh (upper leg). Never inject into any other part of the body. The auto-injector is designed to work through clothing.

    Administer the injection

    • If you are administering epinephrine injection to a young child, hold their leg firmly in place
    • Place the orange tip against the middle of the outer thigh (upper leg) at a right angle to the thigh. Swing and push the auto-injector firmly until it 'clicks'. The click signals that the injection has started
    • Hold firmly in place for 3 seconds (count slowly 1, 2, 3). The injection is now complete
    • Remove the auto-injector from the thigh. The orange tip will extend to cover the needle. If the needle is still visible, do not attempt to reuse it
    • Massage the injection area for 10 seconds
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    Swing and push

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    Hold firmly

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    Remove auto-injector & massage area

    Caution: Never put your thumb, fingers, or hand over the orange tip. Never press or push the orange tip with your thumb, fingers, or hand. The needle comes out of the orange tip.

    Accidental injection into fingers, hands or feet may cause a loss of blood flow to those areas. If this happens, go immediately to the nearest emergency room. Tell the healthcare provider where on your body you received the accidental injection.

  3. Get emergency medical help now

    • You may need further medical attention. You may need to use a second epinephrine injection if symptoms continue or recur. Take your used auto-injector with you when you go to see a healthcare provider
    • Tell the healthcare provider that you have received an injection and where it was injected
    • Give the used epinephrine auto-injector to the healthcare provider for inspection and proper disposal, and ask for a refill if needed

    Rarely, people who have used epinephrine may develop infections at the injection site within a few days of the injection. Some of these infections can be serious. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have redness that does not go away, swelling, tenderness, or area is warm to the touch.

You can’t always predict an allergic emergency, but you can be ready for it.

Two auto-injectors are included whenever you fill a prescription. Work with your healthcare provider on having an emergency plan in place.

A few things to consider about your emergency plan:

  • Are you currently taking any medicines?
  • How many auto-injectors do you have available?
  • Who knows about the allergy and can call 911 in case of an emergency?
  • Who are your emergency contacts аnd do you have their home, work, and cell numbers?

Adapted from the Anaphylaxis Emergency Action Plan by the American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology.

Frequently asked questions.

  • What does “equivalent to EpiPen®” mean?

    That means Teva's Epinephrine Auto-Injector contains the same active ingredient and is expected to work the same way in the body.

  • What does Teva's Epinephrine Auto-Injector treat?

    Teva's Epinephrine Auto-Injector is a prescription medicine used to treat life-threatening, allergic emergencies including anaphylaxis in people who are at risk for or have a history of serious allergic emergencies. The auto-injector contains a single dose of epinephrine for immediate self (or caregiver) administration and does not take the place of emergency medical care. You should get emergency help right away after using Teva's Epinephrine Auto-Injector.

  • How do I know when to use my Epinephrine Auto-Injector?

    The healthcare provider who prescribed the epinephrine auto-injector for you (or your child) will tell you what to look for in an allergic emergency (anaphylaxis) and explain how to use the auto-injector. Only use your auto-injector exactly how your healthcare provider tells you. Anaphylaxis can be life-threatening, can happen within minutes, and can be caused by stinging and biting insects, allergy injections, foods, medicines, exercise, or unknown causes. Some signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

    • Trouble breathing
    • Wheezing
    • Hoarseness (changes in how the voice sounds)
    • Hives (a raised rash that may itch)
    • Severe itching
    • Swelling of the face, lips, mouth, or tongue
    • Skin rash, redness, or swelling
    • Fast heartbeat
    • Weak pulse
    • Feeling very anxious
    • Confusion
    • Stomach pain
    • Losing control of urine or bowel movements
    • Diarrhea or stomach cramps
    • Dizziness, fainting, or “passing out” (unconsciousness)

    For more information please see the Patient Information and Instructions for Use. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider if you have any questions about how to recognize an allergic emergency or how to use the auto-injector.

  • Why are there 2 Epinephrine Auto-Injectors in the carton?

    Having two auto-injectors in each carton allows you to have a second auto-injector readily available.

  • Where should I keep my auto-injector(s)?

    Store the epinephrine auto-injector at room temperature between 68° to 77° F (20° to 25° C). Protect the auto-injector from light and do not expose it to extreme cold or heat. For example, do not store in your vehicle's glove box and do not store in the refrigerator or freezer.

    Examine the contents in the clear window of your auto-injector from time to time. The solution should be clear. If the solution is discolored (pinkish or darker than slightly yellow) or if it is cloudy, replace it.

    Always protect your epinephrine auto-injector from damage and water.

  • Who should know about my emergency plan?

    Let family members, caregivers, and others around you know where your epinephrine auto-injector is kept and how to use it so they’ll be prepared in case of an emergency.

  • How long are auto-injectors good for?

    The expiration date can be found printed on the auto-injector. Do not use your epinephrine auto-injector after the expiration date. Sign up for refill reminders.

  • Why do generics cost less than brand-name medicines?

    Generics cost less than brand-name medicines for 3 main reasons:

    1. Generic manufacturers don't start product development from scratch
    2. Costly clinical trials and research have already been completed by brand manufacturers
    3. Less money is spent on big advertising and marketing programs

    Of course, manufacturers still must show the FDA that the generic performs the same as the brand-name medicine.

  • Can I buy more than one Epinephrine Auto-Injector at a time?

    Talk to your healthcare provider if you need additional auto-injectors to keep at work, school or other locations. Your prescription should include the number of auto-injectors you need. If you are using insurance, the insurance provider may have a maximum number of auto-injectors they will cover per prescription. Contact your insurance provider for details about your plan.

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Important Safety Information

Anaphylaxis can be life threatening, can happen within minutes, and can be caused by stinging and biting insects, allergy injections, foods, medicines, exercise, or unknown causes. Always carry your Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) with you because you may not know when anaphylaxis may happen.

When you have an allergic emergency (anaphylaxis)

  • Use Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) right away.
  • Get emergency medical help right away. You may need further medical attention. You may need to use a second Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) if symptoms continue or recur. Only a healthcare provider should give additional doses of epinephrine if you need more than 2 injections for a single anaphylaxis episode.

Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) should only be injected into the middle of your outer thigh (upper leg). Do not inject the Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) into your: veins, buttocks, fingers, toes, hands, or feet. If you accidentally inject Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) into any other part of your body, go to the nearest emergency room right away. Tell the healthcare provider where on your body you received the accidental injection.

Rarely, patients who have used Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) may develop infections at the injection site within a few days of an injection. Some of these infections can be serious. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following at an injection site: redness that does not go away, swelling, tenderness, or the area feels warm to the touch.

Cuts on the skin, bent needles, and needles that remain in the skin after the injection, have happened in young children who do not cooperate and kick or move during an injection. If you inject a young child with Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector), hold their leg firmly in place before and during the injection to prevent injuries. Ask your healthcare provider to show you how to properly hold the leg of a young child during injection.

If you have certain medical conditions, or take certain medicines, your condition may get worse or you may have longer lasting side effects when you use your Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector). Tell your healthcare provider about all known allergies, all your medical conditions and all the medicines you take, especially if you take asthma medicines.

Common side effects of Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) include: fast, irregular or “pounding” heartbeat; sweating; headache; weakness; shakiness; paleness; feelings of over excitement, nervousness or anxiety; dizziness; nausea or vomiting; and breathing problems. These side effects may go away with rest.

Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

These are not all the possible side effects of Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector). For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Approved Use

Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) is a prescription medicine in a disposable, prefilled automatic injection device (auto-injector) used to treat life-threatening, allergic emergencies including anaphylaxis in people who are at risk for or have a history of serious allergic emergencies. Each device contains a single dose of epinephrine.

Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) is for immediate self (or caregiver) administration and does not take the place of emergency medical care. You should get emergency help right away after using Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector).

Epinephrine Injection, 0.3 mg (Auto-Injector) is for patients who weigh 66 pounds or more (30 kilograms or more). Epinephrine Injection, 0.15 mg (Auto-Injector) is for patients who weigh about 33 to 66 pounds (15 to 30 kilograms). It is not known if Epinephrine Injection (Auto-Injector) is safe and effective in children who weigh less than 33 pounds (15 kilograms).

Please read the Patient Information and Instructions for Use in the accompanying Full Prescribing Information.